Tag Archives: Linux

SFD @ NIT Trichy – Cloud Computing Workshop

It was Software Freedom Day Celebrations at NIT Trichy. And how better could the day have been!! For the first time, Sun Club of NIT Trichy and GLUG-T, The Linux User Group joined hands to conduct the event. We had organized a workshop on cloud computing and Linux/Opensolaris Install Festival.

The way we publicized the event requires a special mention. The hall was confirmed only on the penultimate day, and so we could not put up posters earlier. I designed a poster in a hurry and asked my friends to put them up at strategic places inside the college. And then we sent an SMS to more than 200 students – to all those who had attended our earlier workshops. I had asked the students to register by sending a reply to my number, providing their names and roll numbers, just to have an approximate idea about how many students might be attending the event. This proved to be really effective, and I received about 40 replies in the next two hours. We had a participation of more than 60 students, with participants from B. Tech, M. Tech and CA branches. The hall was nearly full. More importantly, it was full of energy and enthusiasm.

I had to do a night-out to prepare the slides and learn as much as I could about Cloud Computing. And in the end, the presentation came out well, even though most of the information was taken from various sites, videos and other sources.

We asked the students to register at the registration desk and gave them OpenSolaris CD’s, data sheets and Linux Mint CD’s. We then went ahead with discussion on Cloud Computing. I talked about various concepts related to cloud computing. Aswin also chipped in a few important points in between. We also discussed about virtualization and Project Kenai. We kept the students busy and interested by occasionally asking questions and giving away gifts to those who answered.

After the discussion, we went ahead with Linux / Opensolaris Install Fest where we provided installation advice. We also provided the participants VirtualBox installation files, for those who were interested to try out the operating systems but did not want to really install on the hard disk. Special Thanks to Jithin and his GLUG-T team for guiding the students regarding the Linux Installation. Some students had various problems with their Linux/opensolaris installations. A few of them we solved on the spot, whereas the others, we had promised to look into and inform the solutions as soon as possible.

To summarize, it was a great event, an awesome audience and a lot of take-backs for the participants and the organizers. Software Freedom Day was a great success. Looking forward to organizing more such events.

Reliance Data Card in Ubuntu 8.04

Reliance data card ( Huawei ) works really well in Ubuntu, and getting it to work is very easy.

All that one must do is to plug in the USB modem and edit the /etc/wvdial.conf file:

Step 1: Edit the /etc/wvdial.conf file by typing in the following lines

[Dialer Defaults]
Init1 = ATZ
Init2 = ATQ0 V1 E1 S0=0 &C1 &D2 +FCLASS=0
Modem Type = Analog Modem
ISDN = 0
New PPPD = yes
Phone = #777
Modem = /dev/ttyUSB0
Username = **********
Password = **********
Baud = 460800
stupid mode = 1

The username and password generally would be the Reliance number.

Step 2: Run (as root) the following command from terminal:

wvdial /etc/wvdial.conf

The output will be similar to the following:

--> WvDial: Internet dialer version 1.56
--> Warning: section [Dialer /etc/wvdial.conf] does not exist in wvdial.conf.
--> Cannot get information for serial port.
--> Initializing modem.
--> Sending: ATZ
ATZ
OK
--> Sending: ATQ0 V1 E1 S0=0 &C1 &D2 +FCLASS=0
ATQ0 V1 E1 S0=0 &C1 &D2 +FCLASS=0
OK
--> Modem initialized.
--> Sending: ATDT#777
--> Waiting for carrier.
ATDT#777
CONNECT 230400
--> Carrier detected. Starting PPP immediately.
--> Starting pppd at Sun Nov 30 09:34:55 2008
--> Pid of pppd: 11854
--> Using interface ppp0
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> local IP address 220.226.8.49
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> remote IP address 220.224.135.10
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> primary DNS address 202.138.103.100
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]
--> secondary DNS address 202.138.96.2
--> pppd: h?[06][08]p?[06][08]

Now you can browse the internet…

Configuring Cygwin with Netbeans in Windows

Netbeans IDE can be used to create C/C++ Applications. Netbeans running on Linux Platforms dont require any additional configuration if the compilers are already available in the Linux distribution. But to get it working in Windows, a Linux-like environment will be required. 

Cygwin is a Linux-like environment for Windows.

Here is a step by step guide to configure Cygwin with Netbeans in Windows.

Step 1: Installing Netbeans

  • Install JDK. The latest version can be downloaded here
  • Download and install Netbeans. The latest version is Netbeans IDE 6.5. The latest version can be downloaded from http://www.netbeans.org. Make sure you download the bundle that has all technologies.
  • Select C/C++ option while installing. ( It is better to select all the options )

Step 2: Installing Cygwin

  • Cygwin can be downloaded from http://www.cygwin.com
  • Run the setup file.
  • Install from internet. Specify C:\cygwin as the root directory.
  • In the Select Packages dialog box, select the packages required. gcc-coregcc-g++gdb, and make packages are most important. These are the C core, C++ core, the GNU Debugger and the GNU version of ‘make’ utility. These packages will be under the ‘Devel’ category.
  • Complete the installation.

Step 3: Testing Cygwin

  • To test whether Cygwin was installed properly, try the following by opening the bash shell:
  • cygcheck -c cygwin
    gcc --version
    g++ --version
    make --version
    gdb --version
  • If the version details are displayed for all these commands, the installation of Cygwin has been successful.

Step 4: Setting PATH

  • Right click on My Computer and select Properties. Goto Advanced System Settings.
  • Click on Environment Variables.
  • In system variables’ frame choose “Path” and click “edit” button.
  • Now in the variable value textbox give the path of your cygwin/bin directory. (i.e., probably c:\cygwin\bin)
  • Click OK

The setup is done.

Now new C/C++ Projects can be started:

  • Open Netbeans IDE
  • CLick New Project –> C/C++ –> C/C++ Application
  • Choose a Project Name and Location. Then select ‘Finish’.
  • Right click on Source Files under the current Project in the Projects pane on the left side.
  • Select New –> Empty C++ File
  • Type in the C++ Program.
  • Now go to Run –> Run Main Project or press F6 to run the program.

Cygwin has been successfully configured with Netbeans.